TEAM SUCCESS USING MBTI 2018-09-27T17:43:41+08:00

Team Success using MBTI

  • Learning Objectives After completing this session, you should be able to:
  • Discuss how team interactions are influenced by the individual preferences and type of team members
  • Understand how to communicate and work effectively with others using type
  • Develop strategies to work others with opposite preferences to yourself
  • Understanding Your Type
  • During the program we will explain the ideas underlying the MBTI® tool and ask you to undertake a self assessment
  • The score you record on the MBTI® instrument will report one of 16 different types as your results
  • You will use your self-assessment, your results, and Introduction To Type® booklet to decide which type fits best for you
  • The exercises in this program to show you how the types differ from one another and to help you clarify what your type means for you as a leader
  • About the MBTI ® Instrument
  • An indicator – not a test
  • Forced-choice questions
  • No right or wrong answers –Takes about 20-40 minutes to complete
  • Your results are confidential
  • The MBTI® questionnaire looks only at normal behaviour
  • There are no good or bad types – all types have some natural strengths and some possible pitfalls or blind spots
  • Now Let’s Take the MBTI ® Questionnaire
  • As you answer the questions:
  • Think of what you prefer when you do not have outside pressures to behave in a particular way
  • Think of yourself, outside of the roles you play at work or in personal life.

Complete the MBTI Questionnaire Form M 1. Read the instructions on the front 2. Answer the 93 questions – use a ball point pen and a hard surface 3. Do not tear off the side strips and open – we’ll do this together later

Behind MBTI Jung’s Theory – Basic Mental Processes We make decisions about We take in information information Perception Judgement Sensing Intuition Thinking Feeling You can’t use both methods of taking You can’t use both methods of making in information simultaneously, so we judgments simultaneously, so we develop a preference for using one develop a preference for using one method over another method over another

Behind MBTI Jung’s Theory – Orientation of Energy Extraversion Introversion Focus on the outer Focus on the inner world of things, world of thoughts, people, and events feelings, and reflections

  • Jung’s Theory
  • Jung believed that preferences are an innate inborn predisposition
  • He also recognised that our innate preferences interact with and are shaped by environmental influences: – Family – Country – Education – and many more…
  • Jung’s Theory
  • We will look at four sets of opposites – like our right and left hands
  • We all use both sides, but one is our natural preference
  • Jung believed that our preferences do not change – they stay the same over our lifetime
  • What changes is how we use our preferences and often the accuracy with which we can measure the preferences
  • Extraversion or Introversion The direction we focus our attention & energy
  • Extraversion or Introversion
  • E–I People who prefer Extraversion:
  • Focus their energy and attention outward
  • Are interested in the world of people and things People who prefer Introversion:
  • Focus their energy and attention inward
  • Are interested in the inner world of thoughts and reflections We all use both preferences but usually not with equal comfort.
  • People Who Prefer Extraversion:
  • Are attracted to the outer world of people and events
  • Are aware of who and what is around them
  • Enjoy meeting and talking with new people
  • Are friendly, often verbally skilled and easy to know
  • Tend to speak out easily and often at meetings
  • People Who Prefer Introversion:

…..

  • Where do you prefer to focus your attention? Where do you get energy?
  • Review the characteristics of Extraversion and Introversion on Page 6 of Introduction to Type
  • Tick the one that you think describes your natural way of doing things?
  • Sensing or iNtuition The way we take in information and the kind of information we like and trust
  • Sensing or Intuition
  • S–N People who prefer Sensing:
  • Prefer to take in information using their five senses – sight, sound, feel, smell, and taste People who prefer iNtuition:
  • Go beyond what is real or concrete and focus on meaning, associations, and relationships We all use both ways of perceiving but we typically prefer and trust one more
  • People Who Prefer Sensing:
  • See and collect facts and details
  • Are practical and realistic
  • Start at the beginning and take one step at a time
  • Are specific and literal when speaking, writing, and listening

…..

  • People who prefer iNtuition:
  • See patterns, possibilities, connections, and meanings in information
  • Are conceptual and abstract
  • Start anywhere and may leap over basic steps

……

How do you prefer to take in information?

  • Review the characteristics of Sensing and iNuition on Page 6 of Introduction to Type
  • Tick the one that you think describes your natural way of doing things?
  • Thinking or Feeling The way we make decisions

 

  • Thinking or Feeling
  • T–F People who prefer Thinking:
  • People who prefer Thinking:
  • People who prefer Feeling:
  • How do you make decisions?
  • Review the characteristics of Thinking and Feeling on Page 7 of Introduction to Type
  • Tick the one that you think describes your natural way of doing things?
  • Judging or Perceiving Our attitude to the external world and how we orient ourselves to it
  • Judging or Perceiving

 

  • J–P People who prefer Judging:

 

  • People Who Prefer Judging:
  • People Who Prefer Perceiving:
  • How do you deal with the outer world?
  • Review the characteristics of Judging and Perceiving on Page 6 of Introduction to Type
  • Tick the one that you think describes your natural way of doing things?
  • Combined your preferences to estimate your type What do you estimate your E or I type to be? S or N ___ ___ ___ ___ T or F J or P
  • There is variation within each type and type does not measure:
  • Intelligence
  • Illness
  • Affluence
  • IQ
  • Normalcy
  • Stress
  • Maturity
  • Trauma
  • Emotions
  • Psychiatric Illness

 

 

 

 

  • Scoring Your Responses
  • Tear the perforated left side of the form to open the scoring sheet
  • Count the number of Xs in each row and write the number in the shaded area at the end of that row
  • Tally each column at the bottom of the page
  • Copy you score into the Raw Points box
  • Determine your Reported Type
  • Determine your preference clarity
  • Using the Self-Scorable Form M
  • Participants tear off and keep the cover sheet
  • Facilitator to collect the rest of the form
  • Tied Scores for Reported Type:
  • A tied score is when you answered an equal number of questions on each side of the dichotomy: – E.g.. E = 10 I = 10 We use a tie-breaking formula: – I slight – N slight – F slight – P slight Why?
  • Cultural Norms
  • E, S, T, and J are the cultural norms in the USA – I, N, F and P are less preferred
  • If a person is close or tied, there is probably some environmental pressure from the cultural norms
  • Something is pulling them in the direction that is opposite to the cultural norms – their inborn preferences
  • Reported and Self-Estimate Type
  • If these are the same – look up the one-page profile in Introduction to Type® booklet and decide if it describes how you usually think and act
  • If they are different, read the profiles for both self- estimate and reported MBTI® type in Introduction to Type® booklet and decide which is the more accurate
  • Levels of Confidence True Type (never sure) ‘Best-fit’ Type Self-estimate Type & Reported Type

 

 

  • Agreement on Reported Type
  • 2/3 – 3/4 of any group will agree with their reported type
  • They will report general agreement with the Introduction To Type® profile
  • When people disagree, it’s usually on one preference – and often one where they had a slight result
  • Have I Changed Type?
  • When people report having ‘changed type,’ they are most likely to have had an incorrect administration – the mind set was not done properly, resulting in the reporting of ‘work type’ or ‘ideal type.’
  • Why isn’t everyone like me?
  • What would an organisation be like if it were run entirely by people who shared your preferences?
  • You can determine the type of a workgroup by constructing a “Type Table”
  • Type Table # =

___ ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ E= ___ I = ___ S= ___ N = ___ T= ___ F= ___ ISTP ISFP INFP INTP J= ___ P = ___ Modal Type (Most Frequent Type) ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP __ __ __ __ Group Type (Most Frequent Preference) ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ __ __ __ __

 

  • Working with the Type Table
  • Sources of Stress
  • Typical Work Stressors for each of the Preferences Stressors for Extraverts

 

  • Coping with Being Different Your Workgroup’s Preference Preference Consider these tactics

 

  • Typical Work Stressors for each of the Preferences Stressors for Intuitive Types

 

  • Coping with Being Different Your Workgroup’s Consider these tactics: Preference Preference
  • Typical Work Stressors for each of the Preferences Stressors for Thinking Types
  • Coping with Being Different Your Workgroup’s Consider these tactics: Preference Preference
  • Typical Work Stressors for each of the Preferences Stressors for Judging Types

 

  • Coping with Being Different Consider these tactics: Your Workgroup’s Preference Preference
  • Delivering Feedback that caters to Type E I Discuss with a peer if necessary.

 

  • SNTF Problem Solving iNtuition Thinking

The form come in separately, subject to charge/change.

Online questions for alternative.